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Accession Number PB2014-104379
Title Gulf War and Health. Volume 8. Update of Health Effects of Serving in the Gulf War.
Publication Date 2009
Media Count 318p
Personal Author N/A
Abstract The committee began its task with a sense of deep obligation to the servicemen and women who fought so bravely on our behalf in the Gulf War theater. Our appreciation of the risks, privations, and sacrifices that these courageous servicemembers undertook only deepened as our knowledge of the combat mission increased during the course of the committees meetings. There is no greater service that a human being can provide to ones fellow citizens than to risk life and health on their behalf. We are honored to dedicate this report to these troops. As scientists and clinicians, the committee members are also aware of our responsibilities not only to those who served in the Gulf War coalition but also to the cause of science and evidence-based medicine. Only by being true to the latter do we serve the former. There is no doubt that many of the veterans deployed to the gulf region during 1990-1991 have continued to experience troubling constellations of symptoms involving multiple body systems; these have been variously termed multisymptom illness or Gulf War illness, and as such are emblazoned in the publics mind as a consequence of military service in this battleground. Many other veterans have not experienced the full array of Gulf War illness symptoms but continue to suffer from seemingly related symptoms, including persistent fatigue, chronic fatigue syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, memory problems, headache, bodily pains, disturbances of sleep, as well as other physical and emotional problems. Many of these symptoms are difficult to categorize as they have no known cause, no objective findings on clinical examination, no diagnostic biomarkers, no known tissue pathology, and no curative therapy. The inadequate basic understanding of the root cause of these symptoms highlights the limitations of current medical science and clinical practice.
Keywords Biological agents
Chemical agents
Diagnosis
Epidemiology
Exposure
Health concerns
Health effects
Illnesses
Military operations
Persian Gulf War
Toxicology
Vaccines
Veterans(Military personnel)

 
Source Agency Department of Veterans Affairs
National Academy of Science Institute of Medicine
NTIS Subject Category 74D - Chemical, Biological, & Radiological Warfare
57E - Clinical Medicine
74 - Military Sciences
57Y - Toxicology
Corporate Author Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC. Div. of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1412
Contract Number N/A

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