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Accession Number PB2013-111661
Title Camera Recognition.
Publication Date Mar 2013
Media Count 56p
Personal Author B. Stanton D. Chisnell H. Wald M. Steves M. Theofanos
Abstract The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program is a biometrically-enhanced identification system primarily situated at border points of entry such as airports and seaports. The US-VISIT programs goal is to advance the security of the United States and worldwide travel through information sharing and biometric solutions to facilitate identity management. The biometrics currently captured at US-VISIT primary inspection are fingerprints and a facial image. For the purposes of our study, we are interested in the latter. In a 2004 assessment of the quality of facial images captured by US-VISIT, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) discovered a widespread problem: many subjects were (1) not directly facing the camera and (2) had a pose angle of greater than 10 degrees. The findings of NIST's subsequent follow-up studies suggest that the camera used to capture facial images of travelers should look as much as possible like a traditional camera. Knowing where to look will help the subjects being photographed orient themselves in such a way that they are frontal to the camera--thus improving picture quality. This study explored whether participants could discern image capture devices (i.e., cameras) from other types of technology, and the attributes they relied upon to make that distinction. In a controlled environment, we presented participants with 50 images of small (hand-held) devices and asked participants to indicate whether or not a given device was a camera. We then asked participants to group the devices into 2 to 5 categories and list the attributes they had used as a basis for assigning devices to each group.The Department of Homeland Security's (DHS) United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT) program is a biometrically-enhanced identification system primarily situated at border points of entry such as airports and seaports. The US-VISIT programs goal is to advance the security of the United States and worldwide travel through information sharing and biometric solutions to facilitate identity management. The biometrics currently captured at US-VISIT primary inspection are fingerprints and a facial image.
Keywords Airports
Biometrics
Border control
Cameras
Facial images
Fingerprints
Homeland security
Identification systems
Immigrants
Information exchange
Inspections
National security
Pattern recognition
Seaports
Travel
United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technol


 
Source Agency National Institute of Standards and Technology
NTIS Subject Category 62F - Pattern Recognition & Image Processing
82B - Photographic Techniques & Equipment
63G - Personnel Detection
92E - International Relations
Corporate Author National Inst. of Standards and Technology (ITL), Gaithersburg, MD. Information Access Div.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1326
Contract Number N/A

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