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Accession Number PB2013-111004
Title Why Immigrants Leave New Destinations and Where Do They Go.
Publication Date Jun 2013
Media Count 55p
Personal Author D. T. Gurak M. A. Lee M. M. Kritz
Abstract Immigrants have a markedly higher likelihood of migrating internally if they live in new destinations. This paper looks at why that pattern occurs and at how immigrants out-migration to new versus traditional destinations responds to their labor market economic and industrial structure, nativity origins and concentration, geographic region, and 1995 labor market type. Confidential data from the 2000 and 1990 decennial censuses are used for the analysis. Metropolitan and non-metropolitan areas are categorized into 741 local labor markets and classified as new or traditional based on their nativity concentrations of immigrants from the largest Asian, Caribbean and Latin American origins. The analysis showed that immigrants were less likely to migrate to new destinations if they lived in areas of higher nativity concentration, foreign-born population growth, and wages but more likely to make that move if they were professionals, agricultural or blue collar workers, highly educated, fluent in English, and lived in other new destinations. While most immigrants are more likely to migrate to new rather than traditional destinations that outcome differs sharply for immigrants from different origins and for some immigrants, particularly those from the Caribbean, the dispersal process to new destinations has barely started.
Keywords Census
Economic analysis
Geographic regions
Immigrants
Industries
Labor market
Metropolitan areas
Migration
Patterns
Population growth
Wages


 
Source Agency Department of Commerce, Bureau of Census
NTIS Subject Category 92C - Social Concerns
96A - Domestic Commerce, Marketing, & Economics
70D - Personnel Management, Labor Relations & Manpower Studies
Corporate Author Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1324
Contract Number N/A

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