Accession Number PB2013-108847
Title Update on Emergency Department Visits Involving Energy Drinks: A Continuing Public Health Concern.
Publication Date Jan 2013
Media Count 5p
Personal Author N/A
Abstract Energy drinks are flavored beverages containing high amounts of caffeine and typically other additives, such as vitamins, taurine, herbal supplements, creatine, sugars, and guarana, a plant product containing concentrated caffeine. These drinks are sold in cans and bottles and are readily available in grocery stores, vending machines, convenience stores, and bars and other venues where alcohol is sold. These beverages provide high doses of caffeine that stimulate the central nervous system and cardiovascular system. The total amount of caffeine in a can or bottle of an energy drink varies from about 80 to more than 500 milligrams (mg), compared with about 100 mg in a 5-ounce cup of coffee or 50 mg in a 12-ounce cola. Research suggests that certain additives may compound the stimulant effects of caffeine. Some types of energy drinks may also contain alcohol, producing a hazardous combination; however, this report focuses only on the dangerous effects of energy drinks that do not have alcohol.
Keywords Additives
Alcohol
Beverages
Caffeine
Cardiovascular system
Central nervous system
Doses
Emergency visits
Energy drinks
Hazards
Public health

 
Source Agency Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
NTIS Subject Category 57L - Nutrition
57W - Stress Physiology
57U - Public Health & Industrial Medicine
Corporate Author Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1319
Contract Number N/A

Science and Technology Highlights

See a sampling of the latest scientific, technical and engineering information from NTIS in the NTIS Technical Reports Newsletter

Acrobat Reader Mobile    Acrobat Reader