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Accession Number PB2013-101748
Title Feasibility of Bluetooth Data as a Surrogate Measure of Vehicle Operations.
Publication Date Oct 2012
Media Count 127p
Personal Author E. J. Fitzsimmons R. A. Rescot S. D. Schrock
Abstract This research was designed as proof-of-concept study to investigate how Bluetooth data loggers can be used to collect vehicle operational data over traditional vehicle counting methods. The reliability test included mapping areas for five antenna options and their detection reliabilities were investigated. Other tests were conducted to assess the impacts of roadside antenna placement, vehicular speeds and in-vehicle source placement. The feasibility of using data from Bluetooth enabled devices in vehicles as a surrogate for traditional traffic engineering data were investigated for several types of traffic studies. These studies included, urban corridor travel time monitoring, freeway travel time monitoring, origin-destination studies, estimating turning movements at roundabouts, and truck tracking across the state of Kansas. Each of these studies demonstrated how the same technology could be applied to different study objectives. While this technology was found to have enormous potential to collect vehicle operational data, it was not found to be completely stand-alone. An identified weakness of the technology was that it was found to sample around 5 percent of the available traffic. The implication of this was that Bluetooth data were not always available for analysis due to low traffic volumes at some rural locations.
Keywords Bluetooth technology
Cellular telephones
Data collection
Detection
Freeways
Measuring instrument
Monitoring
Real time
Roads
Tracking
Traffic control
Travel indicators
Travel time
Trip generation
Trucks
Wireless communication


 
Source Agency Department of Transportation Office of University Research
NTIS Subject Category 45C - Common Carrier & Satellite
85H - Road Transportation
91B - Transportation & Traffic Planning
43G - Transportation
Corporate Author Kansas Univ., Lawrence.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Final rept.
NTIS Issue Number 1303
Contract Number N/A

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