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Accession Number N20120016913
Title Comparing Volcanic Terrains on Venus and Earth: How Prevalent are Pyroclastic Deposits on Venus.
Publication Date Jun 2012
Media Count 2p
Personal Author B. A. Campbell L. M. Carter L. S. Glaze
Abstract In the last several years, astronomers have discovered several exoplanets with masses less than 10 times that of the Earth (1). Despite the likely abundance of Earth-sized planets, little is known about the pathways through which these planets evolve to become habitable or uninhabitable. Venus and Earth have similar planetary radii and solar orbital distance, and therefore offer a chance to study in detail the divergent evolution of two objects that now have radically different climates. Understanding the extent, duration, and types of volcanism present on Venus is an important step towards understanding how volatiles released from the interior of Venus have influenced the development of the atmosphere. Placing constraints on the extent of explosive volcanism on Venus can provide boundary conditions for timing, volumes, and altitudes for atmospheric injection of volatiles. In addition, atmospheric properties such as near-surface temperature and density affect how interior heat and volatiles are released. Radar image data for Venus can be used to determine the physical properties of volcanic deposits, and in particular, they can be used to search for evidence of pyroclastic deposits that may result from explosive outgassing of volatiles. For explosive volcanism to occur with the current high atmospheric pressure, magma volatile contents must be higher than is typical on Earth (at least 2-4% by weight) (2,3). In, addition, pyroclastic flows should be more prevalent on Venus than convective plumes and material may not travel as far from the vent source as it would on Earth (3). Areas of high radar backscatter with wispy margins that occur near concentric fractures on Sapho Patera (4) and several coronae in Eastern Eistla Regio (5) have been attributed to collapse of eruption columns and runout of rough materials.
Keywords Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric pressure
Coronas
Extrasolar planets
Habitability
Magma
Meteorological parameters
Radar imagery
Terrain
Venus(Planet)
Volcanoes
Volcanology

 
Source Agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NTIS Subject Category 54C - Astrophysics
54A - Astrogeology
Corporate Author Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
Document Type Conference proceedings
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1313
Contract Number N/A

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