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Accession Number N14-0002510
Title Revolutionary Aeropropulsion Concept for Sustainable Aviation: Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion.
Publication Date Sep 2013
Media Count 12p
Personal Author H. D. Kim J. L. Felder M. Armstrong M. T. Tong
Abstract In response to growing aviation demands and concerns about the environment and energy usage, a team at NASA proposed and examined a revolutionary aeropropulsion concept, a turboelectric distributed propulsion system, which employs multiple electric motor-driven propulsors that are distributed on a large transport vehicle. The power to drive these electric propulsors is generated by separately located gas-turbine-driven electric generators on the airframe. This arrangement enables the use of many small-distributed propulsors, allowing a very high effective bypass ratio, while retaining the superior efficiency of large core engines, which are physically separated but connected to the propulsors through electric power lines. Because of the physical separation of propulsors from power generating devices, a new class of vehicles with unprecedented performance employing such revolutionary propulsion system is possible in vehicle design. One such vehicle currently being investigated by NASA is called the 'N3-X' that uses a hybrid-wing-body for an airframe and superconducting generators, motors, and transmission lines for its propulsion system. On the N3-X these new degrees of design freedom are used (1) to place two large turboshaft engines driving generators in freestream conditions to minimize total pressure losses and (2) to embed a broad continuous array of 14 motor-driven fans on the upper surface of the aircraft near the trailing edge of the hybrid-wing-body airframe to maximize propulsive efficiency by ingesting thick airframe boundary layer flow.
Keywords Aircraft engines
Body-wing configurations
Computational fluid dynamics
Electric power
Electric propulsion
Flight control
Gas turbines
Propulsion system performance
Turbogenerators


 
Source Agency National Aeronautics and Space Administration
NTIS Subject Category 51A - Aerodynamics
51C - Aircraft
81D - Jet & Gas Turbine Engines
Corporate Author National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
Document Type Conference proceedings
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1421
Contract Number N/A

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