Accession Number DE2012-1045337
Title High Performance Homes That Use 50% Less Energy Than the DOE Building America Benchmark Building.
Publication Date Jan 2011
Media Count 97p
Personal Author J. Christian
Abstract This document describes lessons learned from designing, building, and monitoring five affordable, energy-efficient test houses in a single development in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) service area. This work was done through a collaboration of Habitat for Humanity Loudon County, the US Department of Energy (DOE), TVA, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The houses were designed by a team led by ORNL and were constructed by Habitat's volunteers in Lenoir City, Tennessee. ZEH5, a two-story house and the last of the five test houses to be built, provided an excellent model for conducting research on affordable high-performance houses. The impressively low energy bills for this house have generated considerable interest from builders and homeowners around the country who wanted a similar home design that could be adapted to different climates. Because a design developed without the project constraints of ZEH5 would have more appeal for the mass market, plans for two houses were developed from ZEH5: a one-story design (ZEH6) and a two-story design (ZEH7). This report focuses on ZEH6, identical to ZEH5 except that the geothermal heat pump is replaced with a SEER 16 air source unit (like that used in ZEH4). The report also contains plans for the ZEH6 house. ZEH5 and ZEH6 both use 50% less energy than the DOE Building America protocol for energyefficient buildings. ZEH5 is a 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath, 2632 ft2 house with a home energy rating system (HERS) index of 43, which qualifies it for federal energy-efficiency incentives (a HERS rating of 0 is a zero-energy house, and a conventional new house would have a HERS rating of 100). This report is intended to help builders and homeowners build similar high-performance houses. Detailed specifications for the envelope and the equipment used in ZEH5 are compared with the Building America Benchmark building, and detailed drawings, specifications, and lessons learned in the construction and analysis of data gleaned from 94 sensors installed in ZEH5 to monitor electric sub-metered usage, temperature and relative humidity, hot water usage, and heat pump operation for 1 year are presented. This information should be particularly useful to those considering structural insulated panel (SIP) walls and roofing; foundation geothermal heat pumps for space heating and cooling; solar water heaters; and roof-mounted, grid-tied photovoltaic systems.
Keywords Benchmarks
Buildings
Construction
Design
Energy efficiency
Heat pumps
Hot water
Houses
Market
Monitoring
Sensors
Solar water heaters
Space heating
Specifications
Tennessee Valley Authority
Urban areas


 
Source Agency Technical Information Center Oak Ridge Tennessee
NTIS Subject Category 97J - Heating & Cooling Systems
97G - Policies, Regulations & Studies
97N - Solar Energy
89B - Architectural Design & Environmental Engineering
Corporate Author Oak Ridge National Lab., TN.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note N/A
NTIS Issue Number 1302
Contract Number DE-AC05-00OR22725

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