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Accession Number ADA592881
Title Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons. Updated January 3, 2014.
Publication Date Jan 2014
Media Count 40p
Personal Author A. F. Woolf
Abstract The FY2013 Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 4310, Section 1037) indicates that it is the sense of Congress that the United States should pursue negotiations with the Russian Federation aimed at the reduction of Russian deployed and nondeployed nonstrategic nuclear forces. The United States and Russia have not included limits on these weapons in past arms control agreements. Nevertheless, some analysts and Members of Congress have argued that disparities in the numbers of nonstrategic nuclear weapons may become more important as the United States and Russia reduce their numbers of deployed long- range, strategic nuclear weapons. During the Cold War, the United States and Soviet Union both deployed nonstrategic nuclear weapons for use in the field during a conflict. While there are several ways to distinguish between strategic and nonstrategic nuclear weapons, most analysts consider nonstrategic weapons to be shorter-range delivery systems with lower yield warheads that might be used to attack troops or facilities on the battlefield. They have included nuclear mines; artillery; short-, medium-, and long-range ballistic missiles; cruise missiles; and gravity bombs. In contrast with the longer-range strategic nuclear weapons, these weapons had a lower profile in policy debates and arms control negotiations, possibly because they did not pose a direct threat to the continental United States. At the end of the 1980s, each nation still had thousands of these weapons deployed with their troops in the field, aboard naval vessels, and on aircraft.
Keywords Arms control
Negotiations
Nuclear weapons
Russia
United states

 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 74H - Nuclear Warfare
Corporate Author Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Congressional rept.
NTIS Issue Number 1412
Contract Number N/A

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