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Accession Number ADA584466
Title Pivot to the Pacific. The Obama Administration's 'Rebalancing' Toward Asia.
Publication Date Mar 2012
Media Count 34p
Personal Author B. Dolven M. E. Manyin M. F. Martin S. Daggett S. V. Lawrence
Abstract In the fall of 2011, the Obama Administration issued a series of announcements indicating that the United States would be expanding and intensifying its already significant role in the Asia-Pacific, particularly in the southern part of the region. The fundamental goal underpinning the shift is to devote more effort to influencing the development of the Asia-Pacific's norms and rules, particularly as China emerges as an ever-more influential regional power. Given that one purpose of the 'pivot' or 'rebalancing' toward the Asia-Pacific is to deepen U.S. credibility in the region at a time of fiscal constraint, Congress's oversight and appropriations roles, as well as its approval authority over free trade agreements, will help determine to what extent the Administration's plans are implemented and how various trade-offs are managed. There are a number of risks to the 'pivot,' however. In an era of constrained U.S. defense resources, an increased U.S. military emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region might result in a reduction in U.S. military capacity in other parts of the world. Another budgetary consideration is that plans to restructure U.S. military deployments in Asia and minimize cuts in the Navy may run up against more restrictive funding constraints than plans yet assume. Additionally, the perception among many that the 'rebalancing' is targeted against China could strengthen the hand of Chinese hard-liners. Such an impression could also potentially make it more difficult for the United States to gain China's cooperation on a range of issues. Additionally, the prominence the Obama Administration has given to the initiative has raised the costs to the United States if it or successor administrations fail to follow through on public pledges made, particularly in the military realm.
Keywords Air-sea battle concept
Asia
Asia-pacific region
Australia
China
Continuity
Cooperation
Costs
Diplomacy
East asia summit
Economic development
Foreign policy
Free trade agreements
International relations
International trade
Military budgets
Military forces(United states)
Military modernization
Multilateral diplomacy
Navy
Pacific ocean
Philippines
Pivot to asia
Risk
Trans-pacific strategic economic partnership
United states government


 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 96 - Business & Economics
92 - Behavior & Society
48 - Natural Resources & Earth Sciences
74 - Military Sciences
Corporate Author Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Congressional rept.
NTIS Issue Number 1402
Contract Number N/A

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