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Accession Number ADA584464
Title New Start Treaty: Central Limits and Key Provisions.
Publication Date Feb 2012
Media Count 38p
Personal Author A. F. Woolf
Abstract The United States and Russia signed the New START Treaty on April 8, 2010. The Senate Foreign Relations Committee and Senate Armed Services Committee both held hearings on the treaty. The U.S. Senate gave its advice and consent to ratification on December 22, 2010, by a vote of 71-26. Both houses of the Russian parliament -- the Duma and Federation Council -- approved the treaty in late January 2011, and it entered into force on February 5, 2011, after Secretary of State Clinton and Foreign Minister Lavrov exchanged the instruments of ratification. New START provides the parties with seven years to reduce their forces, and will remain in force for a total of 10 years. It limits each side to no more than 800 deployed and nondeployed ICBM and SLBM launchers and deployed and nondeployed heavy bombers equipped to carry nuclear armaments. Within that total, each side can retain no more than 700 deployed ICBMs, deployed SLBMs, and deployed heavy bombers equipped to carry nuclear armaments. The treaty also limits each side to no more than 1,550 deployed warheads; those are the actual number of warheads on deployed ICBMs and SLBMs, and one warhead for each deployed heavy bomber. New START contains detailed definitions and counting rules that will help the parties calculate the number of warheads that count under the treaty limits. Moreover, the delivery vehicles and their warheads will count under the treaty limits until they are converted or eliminated according to the provisions described in the treaty's Protocol. These provisions are far less demanding than those in the original START Treaty and will provide the United States and Russia with far more flexibility in determining how to reduce their forces to meet the treaty limits.
Keywords Arms control
Ballistic missile submarines
Bomber aircraft
Government(Foreign)
Guided missile launchers
Icbm launchers
Intercontinental ballistic missiles
Mobile
Mobile icbm launchers
Monitoring
New start treaty
Nuclear warheads
Nuclear weapons
Ratification process
Russia
Slbm launchers
Submarine launched
Treaties
United states government

 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 51C - Aircraft
92 - Behavior & Society
75 - Missile Technology
74H - Nuclear Warfare
Corporate Author Congressional Research Service, Washington, DC.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Congressional rept.
NTIS Issue Number 1402
Contract Number N/A

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