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Accession Number ADA566859
Title Systems Genetics of Chronic Pain.
Publication Date Sep 2012
Media Count 7p
Personal Author C. J. Bult
Abstract Chronic pain is among the most prevalent health problems in the United States today, affecting 10% of the population and costing the US. billions of dollars each year in healthcare expenses, lost income, and lost productivity. Genetic differences among individuals in pain response physiology are partially responsible for observed variation in chronic pain development and maintenance. To identify genes affecting inter-individual variability in chronic pain response we are using a state of the art reference population of laboratory mice (Diversity Outbred mice). Diversity Outbred (DO) mice are a unique population of laboratory mice designed to maximize allelic variation throughout the genome (Churchill, Katti et al. 2012). Each DO mouse is genetically unique. Unlike fully inbred strains, cohorts of DO mice approximate the levels of genetic (allelic) diversity found in human populations. The levels of segregating phenotypic and allelic diversity in DO mice allow for high precision for mapping regions of the genome that condition complex traits. Identifying genes whose allelic variants condition susceptibility to chronic pain development will further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying chronic pain. This information, in turn, promises to facilitate improved methods for individualized chronic pain treatment and prevention.
Keywords Genetics
Genome
Pain
Physiology
Prevention


 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 57A - Anatomy
57S - Physiology
57E - Clinical Medicine
Corporate Author Jackson Lab., Bar Harbor, ME.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Annual rept. 1 Sep 2011-31 Aug 2012.
NTIS Issue Number 1307
Contract Number W81XWH-11-1-0762

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