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Accession Number ADA566624
Title NATO's Level of Ambition in Light of the Current Strategic Context.
Publication Date May 2012
Media Count 57p
Personal Author A. S. Martinez
Abstract In the last two decades, NATO's operations have exposed significant shortcomings in the organization's military capabilities. The Alliance has relied on the United States to provide either the bulk of the forces or the majority of the critical capabilities or both. In 2006, the Alliance established its level of ambition to indicate the number and size of the operations that the organization must be able to perform to meet its challenges. However, the Alliance has failed so far in developing the capabilities required to reach that goal. At the operational level, the main issue for the Alliance has been the ability to build and sustain a strong coalition, with enough forces and capabilities to carry on the mission. As an organization, its recurrent challenge has been to keep the members committed to both providing the resources needed for every operation and developing the critical capabilities that the Alliance requires. In 2010, the Alliance approved a new strategic concept to ensure that it continues to be effective against new threats. However, this agreement does not foresee a revision of the level of ambition. In addition, the United States has issued a new strategic guidance that suggests a reduction in American participation in NATO. Therefore, the question today is whether NATO is able to reach its level of ambition without relying extensively on U.S. military capabilities.
Keywords Afghanistan conflict
Command and control systems
Iraqi war
Kosovo
Level of ambition
Libya
Military capabilities
Military force levels
Military forces(United states)
Military history
Military operations
Missions
Nato forces
Nato operations
Nato training mission-iraq
Strategic concept
United states participation

 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 74 - Military Sciences
74G - Military Operations, Strategy, & Tactics
45C - Common Carrier & Satellite
Corporate Author Army Command and General Staff Coll., Fort Leavenworth, KS. School of Advanced Military Studies.
Document Type Technical report
Title Note Monograph.
NTIS Issue Number 1307
Contract Number N/A

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