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Accession Number ADA562732
Title Technology Strategy Integration.
Publication Date Jun 2012
Media Count 241p
Personal Author K. L. Carter
Abstract Techno-strategic integration is the process through which militaries integrate technological advances into a strategy that maximizes their advantages. While sheer military might is a function of a variety of factors, technology has taken center stage in the past two centuries. The industrial revolution changed the way war was fought; and the changes had wide ranging effects. The calamity of the First World War was in some ways a failure to technostrategically integrate industrial age technology. The history of military technology and strategy illustrates many obstacles to the integration of the two. This thesis shows that successful techno-strategic integration is often highly correlated with effective execution of war and improvement of national security. On the other hand, enduring organizational preferences, inter-service rivalry, and commercial self-interest have often undermined new technostrategic possibilities. However, with the growth and increasing capability of information age technology, this research shows growing indications that the techno-strategic paradigm of the industrial age is shifting. The United States is positioned to capitalize on its lead in informational innovations, and integrating technologies into new concepts of operations. If managed successfully, the United States might emerge with a leaner, more agile force that can keep its strategic competitors at bay.
Keywords First world war
Growth(General)
Integration
Joint military activities
Military critical technology
Military doctrine
Military strategy
National security
Theses

 
Source Agency Non Paid ADAS
NTIS Subject Category 74G - Military Operations, Strategy, & Tactics
Corporate Author Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA.
Document Type Thesis
Title Note Master's thesis.
NTIS Issue Number 1225
Contract Number N/A

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